Start Sutton coldfield dating

Sutton coldfield dating

An affluent town ranked as the fourth least deprived area in the country The name "Sutton Coldfield" appears to come from this time, being the "south town" (i.e.

Mike Hodder, now the Planning Archaeologist for Birmingham City Council, to believe that the site was an Iron Age hill-slope enclosure.

Centuries of agriculture on the land has severely affected the visibility of the features, with the earthworks now only apparent in aerial photography.

Whilst the road ultimately connects Gloucestershire to South Yorkshire, locally, the road was important for connecting Metchley Fort in Edgbaston with Letocetum, now Wall, in Staffordshire.

In his History of Birmingham, published in 1782, William Hutton describes the presence of three mounds adjacent to Chester Road on the extremities of Sutton Coldfield (although now outside the modern boundaries of the town).), is called Loaches Banks and was mapped as early as 1752 by Dr. Hutton interpreted the earthworks as a Saxon fortification but further archaeological work led Dr.

Historically in Warwickshire, it became part of Birmingham and the West Midlands metropolitan county in 1974.

In 2015, the town elected a Parish/Town Council for the first time in its recent history.

Amongst the finds in the area were flint cores and a flint scraper, which had been retouched with a knife.