Start Non sedating antihistimine

Non sedating antihistimine

Prescription-event monitoring is a form of pharmacovigilance, an exercise which has its legal basis in European Union directives 65/65 and 75/319 and in regulation 2309/93.

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The first generation antihistamines have been associated with side effects, particularly sedation.1 Second generation antihistamines are therefore favoured over the first generation drugs, not because of greatly improved efficacy but because they have fewer side effects, especially sedation.24 Although the second generation antihistamines are known to all have similar efficacy,3 the extent of their sedative effects is not well established.

To further examine the sedative effects of four commonly prescribed antihistamines—loratadine, cetirizine, fexofenadine, and acrivastine—we analysed the results of four non-interventional observational cohort studies of these drugs performed by the Drug Safety Research Unit.

General practitioners are also asked to indicate whether the event was considered to be related to the drug, although they are not required to make this connection.

Additionally, the prescribers are asked to indicate whether the drug has been stopped and, if so, the reason for this.

Objectives: To investigate the frequency with which sedation was reported in post-marketing surveillance studies of four second generation antihistamines: loratadine, cetirizine, fexofenadine, and acrivastine. Setting: Prescriptions were obtained for each cohort in the immediate post-marketing period.